The paper on TSEs in the Veterinary Times for Jan 27 2003 can be read in full here.

 

Jan 23 ~"Injecting human brain material into animals is considered "unethical"....

    .... yet "the experiments that are the main support for the hypothesis that vCJD and BSE are the same disease also require that vCJD be injected into the brain of the putative source 'host' animal. Until this is performed, hypotheses of the causal relationship of BSE and other TSE's, including vCJD, remain conjectural and the role of other, possibly environmental, factors must be reconsidered..."
    A new paper on Transmissable Spongiform Encephalopathies by Susan Haywood BVSc, PhD, MRCVS and David R. Brown M.Sc, Ph.D. is published in the Veterinary Times on January 27th The authors "discuss a re-evaluation of the TSE enigma and explore the role of environmental factors in prion diseases."
    Extract: ".....does not conclude that vCJD is caused by BSE, as Phillips implies.
    Circumstantial evidence linking the consumption of beefburgers by young people in support of the transinfection theory, whilst persuasive, has never been proven, in that the putative 'infectious' burgers have never been identified, nor indeed fed, to experimental animals.
    Groups supposedly more at risk such as farmers, vets, abattoir workers and butchers have not shown an increased risk of vCJD.
    It is quite surprising that the one experiment that would confirm a link between BSE and vCJD has not been carried out. If BSE and vCJD are the same strain of disease and take on different characteristics dependent on the host organism, then infecting cows with vCJD should lead to the cows developing BSE.
    This would prove BSE and vCJD to be the same disease. However, those who could have carried out the experiments have classed them as "unethical" because of the need to inject human brain into an animal. It is incontrovertible that, the experiments that are the main support for the hypothesis that vCJD and BSE are the same disease also require that vCJD be injected into the brain of the putative source 'host' animal.
    Until this is performed, hypotheses of the causal relationship of BSE and other TSE's, including vCJD, remain conjectural and the role of other, possibly environmental, factors must be reconsidered.. ...." Read paper

Jan 23 ~" even if manganese is just a risk factor, it is important that this factor be kept in the equation, because it might just be the key that unlocks the truth about these diseases. "

    A new paper on Transmissable Spongiform Encephalopathies by Susan Haywood BVSc, PhD, MRCVS and David R. Brown M.Sc, Ph.D
    .....there is a solid and expanding amount of literature showing that metal imbalance and TSEs are linked....Mark Purdey, a farmer from Somerset, has published evidence that hotspots of TSEs exist in regions of the world where there is environmental imbalance between copper and manganese.
    Farms in Iceland prone to scrapie have soils with dramatically increased manganese levels. A similar situation exists in Colorado where deer develop chronic wasting disease (9). These findings led both Mark Purdey and David Brown to hypothesise that sporadic TSEs might be a result of animals becoming exposed to conditions where manganese in their diets is elevated and copper is deficient.....The Horn report "failed to note that comparing maps of BSE incidence to a map of manganese hotspots across the UK when the epidemic was well established was inappropriate, since BSE was clearly spread at this stage by recycling infected offal.
    A more detailed analysis, looking at the location of the very first cases of where BSE were reported (as viewed on the DEFRA web page,) and the map provided in the Horn report, indicates that the original BSE farms lie directly in a manganese hot spot!
    Others, however, have not allowed themselves to be side tracked in this way but concentrated on the scientific evidence. In particular, authorities in the Environmental Protection Agency in Colorado have begun investigating the link between manganese, copper and chronic wasting disease incidence in deer. This disease was originally thought to be a copper deficiency disease before the prion hypothesis came to be recognised and CWD was recognised as a TSE. Although manganese might not be 'the cause' it is clear from the biochemical studies that have been carried out that metals do play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Therefore, even if manganese is just a risk factor, it is important that this factor be kept in the equation, because it might just be the key that unlocks the truth about these diseases. ....(Read full paper)

Jan 23 ~ More about the Horn Report

    It is interesting to see what Mark Purdey, mentioned in the paper above as having researched the link between metal imbalance and TSEs, had to say about the Horn Report in this article in the Ecologist: "....Since the BSE inquiry had rejected the official scrapie-BSE hypothesis and found in favour of some aspects of my own theory, the UK government responded by setting up a further mini-inquiry to re-examine the origins of BSE. The resulting publication, known as the 'Gabriel Horn Report', employed a mix of misrepresentation and outright bogus disinformation in order to discredit the validity of my theory. When I attempted to sue the government for libel, it pleaded ‘qualified privilege' of the expert committee and then spun out the legal communications beyond the one-year post-publication mark - thereby exempting itself from my claim. See article in the Ecologist by Mark Purdey and the Mark Purdey page on warmwell