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From Defra's April 2004

EMERGENCY VACCINATION PROTOCOL

see http://www.warmwell.com/vacprotocol.htm....

.3 Controls over milk and meat from vaccinated animals:

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  • During emergency vaccination and until 30 days after completion of vaccination (Phase 1), fresh milk would have to be treated* at a dairy either within the vaccination zone or transported outside the zone for treatment subject to strict biosecurity and transport rules. Meat from vaccinated animals would have to be cross-stamped, transported in sealed containers and then treated (heat treated or naturally fermented and matured). Once the meat had been treated, the resulting product would be given the health mark, thus enabling it to enter intra Community trade. Consumers would not see cross-stamped meat. .

  • Post vaccination and prior to completion of NSP survey (Phase 2), fresh milk would have to be pasteurised at a dairy either within the vaccination zone or transported outside the zone for treatment subject to strict biosecurity and transport rules. Fresh meat from vaccinated pigs would continue to require heat treatment before it could be placed on the market. However, fresh meat (excluding offal) from vaccinated ruminants (i.e. sheep and cattle), would be subject to deboning and maturation so that it could bear an oval health mark to enable it to enter intra Community trade. Indications from the industry are that such treatments would be uneconomic for sheepmeat production. .

  • After completion of survey and before FMD free status regained (Phase 3) fresh milk would have to be pasteurised at a dairy either within the vaccination zone or transported outside the zone for treatment subject to strict biosecurity and transport rules. Fresh meat from ruminants would still be subject to deboning and maturation as in Phase 2 but derogation exists which would permit untreated meat from vaccinated cattle and sheep to be marketed freely on the domestic market (i.e. within the Member State), and therefore approach more normal market conditions for livestock producers. Likewise fresh meat from vaccinated pigs would still have to be treated as in Phase 1 but a derogation allows for untreated meat from vaccinated pigs to be placed on the domestic market and may, if requested by another Member State, be exported to them with a special mark.

  • It should be noted that, under the EU FMD Directive, meat and meat products from animals in the Protection Zone and Surveillance Zone and meat and meat products produced in these Zones are also subject to treatment similar to that from vaccinated animals for at least 30 days after these zones have been applied. After 30 days derogation may be granted by SCOFCAH for untreated products to be allowed from the PZ and SZ .

  • There would be no compensation for loss of value of vaccinated animals as there is no reason why their products could not be sold as normal. .

  • The Food Standards Agency have confirmed that there is no risk to human health from consuming products from vaccinated animals and products would not have to be labelled as such.